Can math help clarify the CS mission?

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Customer Success professionals need to start thinking of their mission in a similar way that professionals in Sales and Marketing see theirs. On the Marketing side, they see their mission as finding, nurturing, and qualifying interested parties and moving them further along towards a decision to commit to a financial contract with the marketer’s employer. Straight-forward. On the Sales side, they see their mission as helping those interested parties make that decision to sign the contract thereby securing new revenue for their employers. While the processes and tasks executed by these organizations can be complex and fraught with bumps, their missions are simple.

What is the mission of Customer Success? Is it as clear-cut as those other missions? What is it primarily about?

  1. Renewing customers?
    • Goal = keeping customer numbers up to improve the vendor’s balance sheet
  2. Expanding the business with customers?
    • Goal = growing revenue to improve the vendor’s balance sheet
  3. Helping customers adopt more of the product’s capabilities but motivated by how it benefits the vendor?
    • Goal = helping customer utilize more of the solution so that they feel invested in it and have more of a propensity to renew the financial contract. Symptoms of this behavior are when Customer Success is asked to intervene in sales-sensitive situations to clear technical challenges that are perceived as hurting the chances for renewal or expansion.
  4. Helping customers adopt more of the product’s capabilities but motivated by how it benefits the customer?
    • Goal = helping customer achieve their business goals so they can improve efficiency, or increase market share, or solve other business challenges that prevent them from growing
  5. All of the above?
    • Goal = do whatever is needed

Usually the answer is #5, which makes it not so straight-forward nor so simple. If companies take an honest look at it though, they might admit that they have their Customer Success teams focused on achieving #3, which when it’s considered as starkly as it’s written above, sounds crummy, like it’s short-changing the customer and causing damage to the relationship.

Unlike Marketing and Sales, whose missions are clean and easy to understand, Customer Success is too often charged with having to equally prioritize the following: implementation, enablement, support, consulting, coaching, nurturing, negotiating, selling, closing deals. Why the lack of focus? Pardon the straying into the theater of politics but it almost sounds like Donald Trump’s foreign policy. It’s all over the place, it’s inconsistent, it sends mixed signals, satisfies very few, accomplishes only a fraction of what it hopes to do, and is confusing to the people it’s meant to deal with.

There needs to be some order introduced into the Customer Success world so to make things easier I propose applying some basic math.

Adoption = quality product + clearly defined outcomes + enablement + quality, timely guidance
Renewal = adoption of the solution + quality relationship based on trust
Expansion = adoption of the solution + quality relationship based on trust + clear business need

Looking at it in reverse, Expansion won’t happen until there is Adoption of the solution, the relationship between the parties is good, and the customer has a clear business need for investing more with the vendor. Renewal won’t happen unless there is Adoption of the solution and the relationship is sound. Adoption won’t happen unless the product works, the customer has articulated clear business outcomes, they’ve been enabled with the right skills and knowledge to use the solution to achieve those outcomes, and they’ve received high quality guidance in a timely manner along the way. This is obviously a proactive methodology that prioritizes Adoption above all else. When you see things laid out mathematically they make sense. The logic flows. Changing the equation to prioritize Renewal or Expansion before Adoption defies science and human nature. It might work for some situations but it’ll work against you over time.

To close, and speaking of proactive, I’ll leave you with a line from Silje Nergaard‘s song, Two for the Road.

“I’d rather hit the road than have the road hit me”.  

Maybe it should be on a t-shirt.

 

 

About Peter Armaly
I get jazzed by automation, big data, and blockchain tech. Business, technology, and fitness are things I understand. Scotch, wine, food, and fiction are things I appreciate.

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